Blog

This Week’s Winners and Losers of Social Media

Aug 20, 2014

This week’s social media winners and losers pose some rather interesting questions: Can one man take on a company with 70,000 employees around the world?  Are NFL players really just UFC fighters in the making?  Will Mobile, AL build a water park because of a Change.org petition?

Winners

One man’s criticisms win out against a global brand on Twitter

Through some extensive campaigning, a Twitter handle designed to poke fun at Koch Industries (entitled @WeAreKochs) managed to elicit a real response from the global brand.  In their efforts to combat the troll’s increasingly popular updates, Koch Industries sent out an array of sponsored posts focused on the quality and legacy of their brand.  The issue?  The ads were not targeted, leading to some harsh backlash:

SMWL1.1

Final Score: Internet Trolls – 1, Koch Industries – 0

National Geographic raked in 46.4 million engagements on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram last month

Move aside Kim and Kanye, the hottest accounts on social media belong to National Geographic.  According to AdWeek and Shareablee, “general news” only accounted for 29 Million Facebook engagements in July – which doesn’t seem that large relative to NatGeo’s staggering statistics.   Does this mean social media goers care about the animal kingdom more than they do informative updates?  Maybe so.

Their success also proves the benefits of distributing fun facts and trivia on social media.  By asking questions like, “Why are monarch butterflies quickly disappearing?” users can’t help but click the link to find out the answer.

Final Score: NatGeo – 46.4 Million engagements, Monarch Butterflies – 307 Retweets and 152 favorites

Losers

Why Social Media Managers need to know when the right and wrong time for a witty quip is

After a bench-clearing brawl this past week between the Dallas Cowboys and Oakland Raiders during a scrimmage, the Cowboys’ social media team posted this photo:

dallas cowboys

Note: The UFC is The Ultimate Fighting Championship

While the post itself is comical, it fails to take into the account that the NFL has been trying curtail violence and improve players’ safety.  The image was successful when it came to social media reposts, but, unfortunately, it gave off the wrong impression.

Final Score: Raiders – 889 Retweets and 649 Favorites worth of bad press, Cowboys – A firm scolding from the league, 889 Retweets and 649 Favorites worth of bad press

LaCompagnie’s social media team commits an immeasurable faux pas

La Compagnie is no stranger to social media fails.  It’s most recent one, though, is a rather strange hybrid between poor social media management and a lackluster comprehension of elementary math. luxury airline

All I can say about this one is that LaCompagnie is really lucky that Pythagoras never lived to see Facebook, because that man is not lying flat on a 180 degree angle.  Of course, the account manager just made things even worse in the comment section:

comments luxury airline

If we’ve learned anything from the Koch Industries example, brands should only deign to comment back at trolls if they’re going to do it well.

Final Score: Internet Trolls – 1, La Compagnie – ~145 degrees and one embarrassing post

Just plain strange

A woman in Mobile, AL has generated a significant Facebook following (over 7,500 followers) after suggesting that local officials collaborate with her on the idea of building a water park.  Tammie McCall filed her Change.org petition to reduce the travel and costs for Mobile families to travel to a water park by building one locally.  Her petition calls for a feasibility study to understand the costs and how much local job growth would be impacted.

Final Score: The hopes and dreams of everyone in Mobile, AL – 1, City Councilmen – Lots of paperwork and a city obsessed with getting a waterpark

Who are your winners and losers on social media this week?  Let us know in the comments, or tell us on Twitter @thinkinkpr.

Contact Us

Sign up for our insights on the convergence of business and PR